Walking in Roman Culture

In this book-length treatment of the culture of walking in ancient Rome, Timothy O'Sullivan explores the careful attention which Romans paid to the way they moved through their society.

Walking in Roman Culture

More Books:

Walking in Roman Culture
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Timothy M. O'Sullivan
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2011-07-14 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Walking served as an occasion for the display of power and status in ancient Rome, where great men paraded with their entourages through city streets and elite villa owners strolled with friends in private colonnades and gardens. In this book-length treatment of the culture of walking in ancient Rome, Timothy
The Mind in Motion
Language: en
Pages: 302
Authors: Timothy Michael O'Sullivan
Categories: Rome
Type: BOOK - Published: 2003 - Publisher:

Books about The Mind in Motion
Models from the Past in Roman Culture
Language: en
Pages: 321
Authors: Matthew B. Roller
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-03-22 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Historical examples played a key role in ancient Roman culture, and Matthew B. Roller's book presents a coherent model for understanding the rhetorical, moral, and historiographical operations of Roman exemplarity. It examines the process of observing, evaluating, and commemorating noteworthy actors, or deeds, and then holding those performances up as
Rabbinic Body Language: Non-Verbal Communication in Palestinian Rabbinic Literature of Late Antiquity
Language: en
Pages: 308
Authors: Catherine Hezser
Categories: Religion
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-01-23 - Publisher: BRILL

In Rabbinic Body Language Catherine Hezser examines the literary representation of non-verbal communication within rabbinic circles and in encounters with others in Palestinian rabbinic documents of late antiquity.
Painting, Ethics, and Aesthetics in Rome
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Nathaniel B. Jones
Categories: Art
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-01-31 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

In the first centuries BCE and CE, Roman wall painters frequently placed representations of works of art, especially panel paintings, within their own mural compositions. Nathaniel B. Jones argues that the depiction of panel painting within mural ensembles functioned as a meta-pictorial reflection on the practice and status of painting