The Future Is Asian

In the 19th century, the world was Europeanized.

The Future Is Asian

More Books:

The Future Is Asian
Language: en
Pages: 448
Authors: Parag Khanna
Categories: Business & Economics
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-02-05 - Publisher: Simon & Schuster

In the 19th century, the world was Europeanized. In the 20th century, it was Americanized. Now, in the 21st century, the world is being Asianized. The “Asian Century” is even bigger than you think. Far greater than just China, the new Asian system taking shape is a multi-civilizational order spanning
The Future Is Asian
Language: en
Pages: 320
Authors: Parag Khanna
Categories: Business & Economics
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-11-26 - Publisher: Weidenfeld & Nicolson

Five billion people, two-thirds of the world's mega-cities, one-third of the global economy, two-thirds of global economic growth, thirty of the Fortune 100, six of the ten largest banks, eight of the ten largest armies, five nuclear powers, massive technological innovation, the newest crop of top-ranked universities. Asia is also
The Future is Asian
Language: en
Pages: 400
Authors: Parag Khanna
Categories: Business & Economics
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019 - Publisher:

Books about The Future is Asian
Move
Language: en
Pages: 352
Authors: Parag Khanna
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-10-12 - Publisher: Simon and Schuster

A compelling look at the powerful global forces that will cause billions of us to move geographically over the next decades, ushering in an era of radical change. In the 60,000 years since people began colonizing the continents, a recurring feature of human civilization has been mobility—the ever-constant search for
Connectography
Language: en
Pages: 496
Authors: Parag Khanna
Categories: Business & Economics
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-04-19 - Publisher: Hachette UK

Which lines on the map matter most? It's time to reimagine how life is organized on Earth. In Connectography, Parag Khanna guides us through the emerging global network civilization in which mega-cities compete over connectivity and borders are increasingly irrelevant. Travelling across the world, Khanna shows how twenty-first-century conflict is