Cult TV Heroines

From Mrs Peel to the first female Doctor Who, this book offers a timely focus on the popular phenomenon of the cult TV heroine.

Cult TV Heroines

More Books:

Cult TV Heroines
Language: en
Pages: 224
Authors: Catriona Miller
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-10-29 - Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

From Mrs Peel to the first female Doctor Who, this book offers a timely focus on the popular phenomenon of the cult TV heroine. The enduring phenomenon of cult TV itself is carefully explored through questions of genre, the role of the audience and the external environment of technological advances
Cult TV Heroines
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Catriona Miller
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012-11 - Publisher:

Books about Cult TV Heroines
Cult TV
Language: en
Pages: 256
Authors: Jon E. Lewis, Penny Stempel
Categories: Comedy programs
Type: BOOK - Published: 1998 - Publisher:

Cult TV is the only guide providing comprehensive information on all your favourite cult shows. Covering over 300 TV programmes the authors outline each show from conception to execution, with cast lists plus litle-known facts and anecdotes.'
Cult TV
Language: en
Pages: 288
Authors: Jon E. Lewis, Penny Stempel
Categories: Performing Arts
Type: BOOK - Published: 1996 - Publisher: Pavilion Books

From Emergency Ward 10 to ER and Quatermass to the X Files, cult television programmes have held viewers in their thrall for 40 years. In the '90s, satellite broadcasters have fuelled viewers' hunger for cult shows, while the terrestrial stations have muscled in with timewarp re-runs and new classics. Shows
The Essential Cult TV Reader
Language: en
Pages: 414
Authors: David Lavery
Categories: Performing Arts
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-03-17 - Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

The Essential Cult TV Reader is a collection of insightful essays that examine television shows that amass engaged, active fan bases by employing an imaginative approach to programming. Once defined by limited viewership, cult TV has developed its own identity, with some shows gaining large, mainstream audiences. By exploring the